Shortly after I was born, my mother developed diabetes. It runs in our family; I lost an uncle to the disease, and I have other relatives who struggle with it. I remember the day I sat with her, after doctors had told her the limitations of Western medicine when it came to diabetes. I asked her about her time as a nurse in Korea, and what she knew of Eastern medicine. And the same word kept coming up time and again: Tea.

To get rid of it, the first thing you might want to do is tone down the drinking. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the 2015-2020 U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that men should consume no more than two alcoholic drinks per day, and women should consume no more than one alcoholic drink per day. The second thing, according to Tom Cowen, head personal trainer for Xercise4less, is “to have a state of negative energy balance – burn more calories than you’re consuming,” he told the Daily Star.

Focus on compound moves like deadlifts, squats, kettlebell swings, lunges, chest presses, shoulder presses — exercises that work your entire body rather than isolating muscles. Simply put, you cannot 'spot-reduce' fat, meaning that endless crunches will do little for getting rid of your belly. For best results split your sessions over different days.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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