One reason excess visceral fat is so harmful could be its location near the portal vein, which carries blood from the intestinal area to the liver. Substances released by visceral fat, including free fatty acids, enter the portal vein and travel to the liver, where they can influence the production of blood lipids. Visceral fat is directly linked with higher total cholesterol and LDL (bad) cholesterol, lower HDL (good) cholesterol, and insulin resistance.
A pear-shaped body type tends to have a smaller waist with larger hips and legs. Although an overweight pear-shaped person may still have higher than ideal levels of visceral fat, her risk for heart disease tends to be lower because she stores more fat in her extremities. As a result, she has less toxic fat surrounding her organs and producing dangerous hormones and byproducts.
» Solution: Burn this type of belly fat by limiting the caffeine (seriously), giving yourself a bed time, prepping your snacks or stock only healthy ones and making sure you're getting magnesium. Instead of trying to scorch the fat off, try a more gentle approach with your workouts, like yoga or light resistance training. Try the Yoga Sequence to Blast A Muffin Top workout.
It’s time to get real about the dangers of belly fat, because it’s affecting more of us than ever before. According to the latest government stats, 26 per cent of British adults are classified as obese. That’s just over one in four people, meaning that Britain is on-track to become the fattest country in Europe by 2025. If current trends continue, forecasters have warned that half of us will be obese by 2045.

This is the result of a lazy thyroid, the gland being responsible for producing hormones that control the metabolism. A lower metabolism is surely a trigger for weight gain, but it’s not just the excess belly fat that gives headaches to this group of people: they also tend to have poor circulation and cold extremities, hair loss, saggy underarm skin and brittle fingernails.

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