Stubborn tummy fat can be very hard to shift. Due to our often sedentary lifestyles and stressful jobs, medicated with alcohol and biscuits, belly fat can easily build up. And, it's not just our ability to win the swimsuit competition that's affected by the belly build up: fat deposits around the belly are linked to serious health issues, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. 
In fact, liquid calories now make up a whopping 21 percent of our daily calorie intake—more than 400 calories every single day, more than twice as much as we drank 30 years ago. To give you a perspective on those numbers, imagine taking two slices of Pizza Hut Thin ‘N Crispy Pepperoni Pizza, tossing them in a blender and hitting “puree,” then drinking the whole thing down. That’s 420 calories. Now imagine that the typical American has been doing this every single day for years.
Omega 3 fatty acids are lauded with such attractive qualities as delaying ageing and fighting degenerative diseases. However, it's less well known that eating fatty fish is also excellent for weight loss (when accompanied by a balanced diet and regular exercise, of course). Foods such as mackerel and herring are high in protein and 'good fats' that help to break down some of the more dangerous fats in your body. Try to eat fish twice or thrice a week.
Belly fat has gotten a mostly deserved reputation as an unhealthy fat. "Understand that belly fat is both visceral and subcutaneous," says Kristen Gill Hairston, MD, MPH, an assistant professor of medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, N.C. "We don't have a perfect way yet to determine which [of belly fat] is subcutaneous or visceral, except by CT scan, but that's not cost-effective."
The stress hormone cortisol can really screw with your belly. The problem with cortisol is two-fold: First, the chemical makeup of cortisol causes the body to store visceral fat. Visceral fat is stored between your main organs and in the midsection and is the most dangerous type of fat. Experts state that visceral fat increases the risk of diabetes and heart disease.
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