Lower belly fat also reveals poor sleep habits. Researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine examined five years of sleep habits and visceral fat accumulation in adults younger than 40; they found that those who slept less than six hours per night or more than nine hours, on average, had higher amounts of belly fat. Their results, published in Sleep in 2010, suggest that getting a good night's sleep helps deter the development of lower belly fat.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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