YOU DO NOT NEED THIS BOOK. The cleanse that it recommends works because 1) it slashes calories to around 1000 per day; and 2) it eliminates most added sugar, with the carbohydrates mostly coming from fruits, vegetables, dairy and whole grains. If that was all you did, you would lose weight. You would drop a fair amount of water weight the first few days just by cutting added sugar from your diet. It recommends replacing sweetened drinks with tea which isn't a bad idea - if you're drinking Frappuccinos and soda all day, you will lose weight if you drink tea and water instead. It's that easy. Save your money, you don't need this book for that. If, however, you want brief summaries of the benefits of different kinds of tea and some low-carb, clean recipes for smoothies and dinners, by all means buy this book - that's why I've given it a couple stars. I just wish I could get my money back. I bought this in a moment of weakness for nearly $15 when it is worth maybe $2.
When you decide to “go on a diet,” you’re making the conscious decision that this is a temporary choice. You’re going to go on it, but that means that you’re going to one day—probably sooner than you expect—go off it. That’s the concept of weight cycling (also known as yo-yo dieting), and it’s extremely unhealthy. A 2014 study in the journal Diabetes Care found that a pattern of weight cycling—losing at least five pounds and then gaining it back within two years—resulted in as much as a 33 percent higher risk of diabetes and higher blood pressure.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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