When your cortisol levels are through the roof, it triggers the release of insulin, and this is where things go awry. Initially, the ‘fight-or-flight’ response shuts down your digestive system so you can deal with the “threat”, like a very hungry lion or, more realistically, heavy traffic on your way to work. Once the danger has passed, your body seeks to replenish the hundreds of calories you burned fighting to the death/swearing at rush hour traffic and makes you ravenously hungry.
After analysing 1,257 men and 1,366 women who participated in the Canada Fitness Survey they found waist size, "remained significantly lower in subjects performing high-intensity exercise." Worth stressing is this is not casually rolling back and forth on an ab machine or leisurely mounting the thigh master. An idea echoed by research published in the Journal of Obesity who stated, "High Intensity training three times per week was associated with significant reductions in total body fat, leg and trunk fat."
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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