Refined grains, more so than whole grains, expand your waist. In a 2010 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers found that increased intake of refined grains correlated with a greater amount of belly fat, while an increased intake of whole grains did not. Eat brown rice, quinoa and 100-percent whole-wheat bread in lieu of white rice and pasta. Include ample watery, fibrous vegetables at meals too -- they'll help fill you up without too many calories.
When you decide to “go on a diet,” you’re making the conscious decision that this is a temporary choice. You’re going to go on it, but that means that you’re going to one day—probably sooner than you expect—go off it. That’s the concept of weight cycling (also known as yo-yo dieting), and it’s extremely unhealthy. A 2014 study in the journal Diabetes Care found that a pattern of weight cycling—losing at least five pounds and then gaining it back within two years—resulted in as much as a 33 percent higher risk of diabetes and higher blood pressure.
A very rich dietary food, beans are packed full of nutrients, fiber, and protein. The protein and fiber are particularly good at helping reduce hunger after eating and decrease cravings that lead to excessive snacking. By helping reduce overall calorie intake, beans help reduce lower belly fat. Science Daily backs up these statements by reporting that beans “increased the feeling of fullness by 31 per cent, which may indeed result in less food intake.” Further, they state that “including [beans] in your diet may help you lose weight, and we think more importantly, prevent you from gaining it back after you lose it.” (6) Just be careful how you prepare and what you serve your beans with. If you are used to serving green beans with butter, cut the butter out. Avoid baked beans since they are cooked with large amounts of sugar, preservatives, and not good fats. Instead, try beans steamed or boiled and seasoned with herbs and spices.
So-called "detox" teas have been popular for years, primarily among people who frequent health-food stores, or consult with alternative practitioners. These days, though, they've become big business, and a handful of celebrities are touting their weight-loss benefits on social media. In a way, detox teas have become the liquid version of waist trainers–the before and after results are often dramatic, and their celeb backing generates buzz, but you may be wondering: Do they really work, and are they safe? Before you plunk down your hard-earned money and start sipping, here are five things you should know.
Watermelon detox water is a modern amenity that everyone should at least get to try once. There is no effort involved in this rapturous drink, and it yields a bounty of relaxation. Melons are great for cleaning out the bladder, and mint quells the woes of an upset tummy. Moms love giving this detox beverage to kids, and it is a great way to eliminate artificial fruit juices from the household diet. With this kind of water, every glass is unique. With an active curiosity, any kitchen can become a haven for alchemy. Prepare to turn H2O into liquid gold.
A few years back, the authors of Eat This, Not That! commissioned ChromaDex laboratories to analyze 14 different bottled green teas for their levels of disease-fighting catechins. While Honest Tea Honey Green Tea topped the charts with an impressive 215 milligrams of total catechins, some products weren’t even in the game. For instance, Republic of Tea Pomegranate Green Tea had only 8 milligrams, and Ito En Teas’ Tea Lemongrass Green had just 28 milligrams, despite implying on its label that the product is packed with antioxidants.
According to the National Institutes of Health, the third largest source of food calories in the American diet isn’t a food at all. It’s soda. We get more calories from soda every day than we do meat, dairy or anything other than baked goods. How can that be possible? Because of all the sugar. Mountain Dew, for example, not only delivers 52 grams of sugar per 12-ounce can, but gives you a delicious side helping of bromated vegetable oil, a component of rocket fuel. And I don’t mean metaphorical rocket fuel—I mean the stuff they actually put in the engines to keep the gears from exploding.
You probably already know that chamomile tea can help induce sleep (there’s even a brand called Sleepy Time). But science is showing that teas actually work on a hormonal level to lower our agita and bring peace and slumber. Studies have found that herbal teas like valerian and hops contain compounds that can actually reduce levels of stress hormones in our bodies, bringing on sleep — and reducing the body’s ability to store fat!
That’s in part because when you restrict calories, you restrict nutrients. As a result, you lose weight on a crash diet, but much of it is lean, healthy muscle tissue. With less muscle, your body’s metabolism is set at a lower point. So when you go off the diet, even if you eat the exact same number of daily calories as you ate before, you’ll actually gain more fat than you originally carried.

I've had every tea that is listed in this book and never noticed any of the results that are claimed. Hell, I even went pretty deep into Puer tea and bought a few hundred dollars of the stuff, then spent months drinking it and noticed nothing at all by way of results. Over a year ago I came across information that explained that the difference between people who get results from drinking tea, whether green tea or white tea, oolong, or puer tea, is that those who got results were drinking between 4 - 5 cups a day, while those who didn't get results were only drinking 1 or 2 cups a day. So, I started making a habit of drinking 4 - 5 cups a day. I even started making tea and keeping it in 1 liter bottles in my refrigerator, to make it easy to drink iced tea whenever I wanted. After nearly a year now of drinking 4 - 5 cups a day of green, white, oolong, puer, and other teas, I do not believe drinking any of these teas aided in any weight I've lost at all, as there have been periods of a week here and there where I've not drank any tea, and when I added it back in, I didn't notice any additional weight being lost at all. So, it may simply be a matter of individual physiology, but for me, whether I drink tea or not there is no noticeable difference, no noticeable increase in the amount of weight which is lost. The book simply makes it sound like every tea is going to produce some kind of magical effect, and that's what bothers me the most. While tea may be a useful addition to a weight loss program, from my experience, it certainly is not a weight loss miracle the way it's made out to b by this author.
Why the discrepancy? The fact is, store-bought teas typically lose 20 percent of EGCG/catechin content during the bottling process, which is why brewing your own is so critical. If you really want bottled tea then shoot for versions with an acid like lemon juice or citric acid, which help stabilize EGCG levels. Recent studies show that the more acidic the environment, the more stable the tea’s nutrients. But even in a highly acidic drink, more than half of the nutrients are gone within 3 months.
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A delicious and refreshing beverage, peppermint tea has soothing and calming effects on your system, which help reduce stress and keep the body on track. Remember, stress can hamper your metabolism and disrupt your weight loss efforts. The strong aroma of peppermint tea can also help suppress appetite, which is vital for promoting fat loss. Since peppermint contains volatile compounds, such as menthol, menthone, hesperidin, luteolin, and eriocitrin, drinking this tea can help improve health in a number of ways.

A pear-shaped body type tends to have a smaller waist with larger hips and legs. Although an overweight pear-shaped person may still have higher than ideal levels of visceral fat, her risk for heart disease tends to be lower because she stores more fat in her extremities. As a result, she has less toxic fat surrounding her organs and producing dangerous hormones and byproducts.
Unless you hit the genetic jackpot, the chances are that your tummy isn’t immune to showing its fat gains. Something interesting is that there are different kinds of belly fat, and they all require different techniques for shedding it. Belly fat isn’t merely an issue of appearance. Sure, it looks and feels nice to have a shredded tummy, but more important are the health implications.
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