Lower belly fat also reveals poor sleep habits. Researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine examined five years of sleep habits and visceral fat accumulation in adults younger than 40; they found that those who slept less than six hours per night or more than nine hours, on average, had higher amounts of belly fat. Their results, published in Sleep in 2010, suggest that getting a good night's sleep helps deter the development of lower belly fat.
In men, adequate levels of testosterone are necessary to maintain a healthy fat distribution. However, research has shown that the presence of visceral fat can interfere with testosterone production, further exacerbating the storage of fat in the belly. Excess abdominal fat not only reduces testosterone production, but is also associated with a rise in the female hormone estradiol in men. It is unclear if testosterone decline associated with aging disrupts the production of testosterone, or if the accumulation of fat via weight gain leads to lower levels of testosterone. Either way, the reduction of visceral fat via lifestyle changes is beneficial for overall health in men.

First one’s the Adrenal belly or Adrenal shape, caused by increased levels of cortisol. When going through stressful periods, the production of cortisol increases, and this favours the accumulation of fat around the waist, leading to a saggy abdomen. Both men and women are likely to gain weight around the waist if they are constantly exposed to high levels of stress, and besides the excess belly fat, they are also likely to experience fatigue, back pain, nervousness, poor memory and sleep problems.
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