There are two distinct types of fat in our bodies that differ by location and impact on overall health—subcutaneous fat and visceral fat. Subcutaneous fat is located under the skin and accounts for 90% of body fat. The remaining 10% is visceral fat, which is found deeper in the body, behind the abdominal muscles and around the intestines, liver, and other organs. Visceral fat is also known as intraabdominal fat because it collects in the abdominal cavity. It has long been known that body fat located in the abdominal cavity in the form of visceral fat poses serious risks to overall health.
Cleansing can help you to get a flatter stomach. However, it will not be easy, and cleansing alone will probably not lead to your long-term weight-loss goals. A good cleanse can get your body back to burning fat optimally, in order to jump-start your flat stomach diet. Combine a cleanse with fasting, physical exercise and a sensible eating plan, and you will be looking down at a flat stomach in no time.
Lower belly fat also reveals poor sleep habits. Researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine examined five years of sleep habits and visceral fat accumulation in adults younger than 40; they found that those who slept less than six hours per night or more than nine hours, on average, had higher amounts of belly fat. Their results, published in Sleep in 2010, suggest that getting a good night's sleep helps deter the development of lower belly fat.
Belly fat is excess abdominal fat surrounding the organs in your stomach. There are three types of fat: triglycerides (the fat that circulates in your blood), subcutaneous fat (the layer directly below the skin’s surface) and visceral fat (dangerous belly fat). Visceral fat is located beneath the muscles in your stomach and poses many dangers to your health when there is too much of it.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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