What can you do to reverse a post-pregnancy mommy belly bulge? Make sure you’re doing your Kegels to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles, which support your uterus, and also your urethra, bladder, and rectum. Whilst you’re sitting down, squeeze your pelvic muscles together (as if you’re trying to stop a stream of urine), then continue squeezing, bringing this same sensation up your abdomen so you’re contracting your stomach at the same time.
Do cardiovascular exercise on an empty stomach first thing in the morning. Sweating is one of our body's methods of eliminating toxins. Besides being excellent for heart health, cardio training burns calories to help tighten that mid-section. Try 30 to 60 minutes of low-intensity cardio per day. Low-intensity burns more body fat, according to the "Muscle Nerd" Jeff Anderson. Remember that cardio is cumulative, so feel free to spread your exercise out over several smaller sessions throughout the day.
Lower belly fat also reveals poor sleep habits. Researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine examined five years of sleep habits and visceral fat accumulation in adults younger than 40; they found that those who slept less than six hours per night or more than nine hours, on average, had higher amounts of belly fat. Their results, published in Sleep in 2010, suggest that getting a good night's sleep helps deter the development of lower belly fat.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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