This is one of the sweetest detoxifiers out there. It derives a big blast of sugar from its decadent array of fruits that includes pineapple, orange and agave. Grated ginger is also sprinkled on top to pack a spicy punch. It is also an elite digestive aid, especially for those with ulcers or a history of cramps. With this elixir, there is a lot of sharpness in terms of flavor, but the thick agave nectar can smooth out everything for a divinely syrupy texture. All of the citrus fruits naturally join forces to fortify stomach, intestines and colon. Say cheers!
Rachel is a writer, Montessori teacher, and mother, happily living with her family in Guatemala where fresh coffee is always ready. Professionally, she enjoys providing her audiences with thought-provoking articles about health and fitness, early childhood education, and parenting. When she's not busy meeting deadlines, Rachel, a former long-distance runner, still makes fitness and health a priority in her life. She enjoys concocting healthy meals in the kitchen, going for long walks and chasing after her 3 young children.

Aloe is a sensational digestive aid, and its incorporation into DIY detox water is revolutionary for dieters everywhere. A household plant can be a perfect specimen for harvesting healing gel. The ooze can be gently extracted with a knife tip before being blended into lemon juice. This serenely sour liquid dilutes the aloes thickness for easy absorption into the blood stream. Once digested, aloe promotes relief from fatigue by boosting energy production from the inside. Please note that pregnant women are cautioned against consuming aloe ingredients, but everyone else can raise a toast to purification with this serenely refreshing selection.
Detox teas that combine caffeine with diuretics can trigger the loss of water weight. Just two cups of water weighs one pound on a scale, so shedding fluid can make you look and feel lighter–even if you haven't lost an ounce of body fat. Detox teas can also trigger a laxative effect, which causes your body to eliminate waste from your GI tract, another result that can make your stomach flatter, and allow you to feel lighter, even if your lean-to-fat ratio remains exactly the same. If this quick-fix effect gives you the confidence boost and motivation you need to start eating healthier and working out–the real keys to getting healthy and lean–terrific (assuming the teas are even safe to drink–see below). Just remember: If you go back to your former less-than-stellar eating or exercise habits, or stop drinking the tea, you can gain the weight right back just as quick as you dropped it.

A pear-shaped body type tends to have a smaller waist with larger hips and legs. Although an overweight pear-shaped person may still have higher than ideal levels of visceral fat, her risk for heart disease tends to be lower because she stores more fat in her extremities. As a result, she has less toxic fat surrounding her organs and producing dangerous hormones and byproducts.
Parsley has many, many health benefits, including reducing effects of diarrhoea, improving digestion, regulating the menstrual cycle and increasing the rate of urination, which means that more matter is expelled from the body, including more calories and thus reducing weight loss. The diuretic aspect of parsley juice also means that it detoxifies the body faster than other drinks, and acts as an appetite suppressant making you feel fuller than you are.
There are currently no legal requirements for food manufacturers to label trans fats, according to the British Dietetic Association, so you need to check ingredients lists for hydrogenated fats and hydrogenated vegetable oils. The biggest culprits? Your ‘cheat day’ favourites: cakes, biscuits, ice cream, popcorn, pies, fried food, fast food, takeaways — the list goes on.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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