Everyone stores fat differently. Some people might tuck it under their chin whereas others might collect it on their arse. This is because research published in the European Journal of Clinical Investigation found that fat cells - known as adipocytes - behave differently depending on where they're found on the body. For instance fat cells in the, "Abdominal region are metabolically much more active than those in the femoral (thigh) region."

If lots of women in your family have big bellies (rather than big hips or big butts), your DNA may be stacked against you. "About 50 to 60% of belly fat and weight gain is based on genetics," says Murphy. "You can't really change genes. But what you can do is modify their expression." Simply put, genetics may predispose a woman to gain weight in her midsection—but diet and exercise can influence how much weight stays on, and where.
If you ever need to treat a hangover, you’ve just stumbled on the right beverage for getting the job done. Coconut water is intensely hydrating, and it possesses an uncanny ability to mitigate come-downs from alcohol. It eases digestion and flushes harmful chemicals. A small navel orange pushes protective measures into the digestive systems, and blueberries banish all internal poisons while energizing the mind. With 4 sprigs of lush lavender, this drink is sultry and aromatic. This cunning combination can treat headaches and stomach aches alike. As an added bonus, the entire detox recipe is vegan and free of gluten.
Wheatgrass has a high concentration of iron, magnesium, calcium, amino acids, vitamins C, A and E, B12, B6 and chlorophyll. These vitamins and minerals provide many therapeutic benefits. Consuming wheatgrass can rid the digestive system of harmful bacteria and cleanse the body of toxins. It also cleanses the colon and can help in the treatment of joint pain, ulcerative colitis, skin infections and can even prevent diabetes. No wonder it is regarded as a superfood!
If antioxidants are the good guys of gut health, trans fats are the supervillains. These sneaky fats actively contribute to your wobbly waist – not just by adding new fat, but by moving fat from other areas of your body to your belly. During a six-year study at Wake Forest University, monkeys that were fed an 8 per cent trans fat diet had 33 per cent more belly fat than monkeys that were fed an 8 per cent monounsaturated fat diet.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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