When you decide to “go on a diet,” you’re making the conscious decision that this is a temporary choice. You’re going to go on it, but that means that you’re going to one day—probably sooner than you expect—go off it. That’s the concept of weight cycling (also known as yo-yo dieting), and it’s extremely unhealthy. A 2014 study in the journal Diabetes Care found that a pattern of weight cycling—losing at least five pounds and then gaining it back within two years—resulted in as much as a 33 percent higher risk of diabetes and higher blood pressure.
Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus Globulus), Ginger (Zingiber Officinale), Anise (Pimpinella Anisum), Tamarind (Tamarindus Indica), Red Raspberry (Rubus Idaeus), Cranberry, Blackberry, Knapweeds (Centaurea), Cornflower(Cyanus), Chamomile (Chamomilla Recutita), Ginseng (Panax Ginseng), Rose Hips (Rosa Canina Fructus), Lemon Grass (Cymbopogon Citratus), Fennel (Foeniculum Vulgare)
Cynthia Sass is a nutritionist and registered dietitian with master's degrees in both nutrition science and public health. Frequently seen on national TV, she's Health's contributing nutrition editor, and privately counsels clients in New York, Los Angeles, and long distance. Cynthia is currently the sports nutrition consultant to the New York Rangers NHL team and the New York Yankees MLB team, and is board certified as a specialist in sports dietetics. Cynthia is a three time New York Times best selling author, and her brand new book is Slim Down Now: Shed Pounds and Inches with Real Food, Real Fast. Connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.
While carrots themselves are highly nutritious, it is claimed that juicing makes the vegetable juice more nutrient-dense, helping you keep nourished while you’re on the go - compared to raw carrots. What’s even more, carrot juice is very low in calories and quite filling due to high fibre content. Hence, carrot juice is an excellent substitute for sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages when trying to drop the pounds or get rid of that unhealthy belly fat faster. Read - Rice diet plan for weight loss: Does eating Basmati rice help you lose belly fat?
Water is a dieter’s best friend. On its own, it can be a powerful weight loss tool. However, adding lemon to water not only can help you slim down but has a vast range of health benefits that can keep you looking and feeling your very best. There are many health benefits from drinking lemon water including fighting cancer, boosting the immune system, preventing asthma, and weight loss, to name only a few benefits. (8) Lemon water has nutrients that can actually help boost your metabolism. Also, drinking lemon water before a meal helps reduce the overall amount you will eat. Another benefit is that adding lemon to water can make it more refreshing and makes you more likely to drink more during the day. The more water you drink in place of sugary or fatty drinks, the fewer calories you intake and the more likely you are to lose weight.
Green or white teas make great bases for smoothies. In a study presented at the North American Association of the Study of Obesity, researchers found that regularly drinking smoothies in place of meals increased a person’s chances of losing weight and keeping it off longer than a year. Add your favorite tea to one of these 56 Smoothie Recipes for Weight Loss!
An easy way to determine if you have too much belly fat is to measure yourself at home. Take a measuring tape and wrap it around your bare stomach, directly above your hip bone. The tape should be snug but not too tight. For women, a measurement of 35 inches or more indicates an unhealthy amount of belly fat. For men, a measurement of 40 inches or more indicates an unhealthy measure.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
×