Here's the funny thing about chamomile: While it's the most popular tea for bedtime, there's actually no evidence that it improves the length or quality of sleep. But there's a lot of evidence that it does something even more mysterious: It reduces the stress that comes with insomnia. One German study found that chamomile tea significantly improved the physical symptoms related to a lack of sleep, and even helped reduced levels of depression in the chronically sleep-deprived. Another study found that it improved daytime wakefulness in people who suffered from a lack of sleep. To maximize its effects, look for a chamomile/lavender blend. In a study of postpartum women, those who drank lavender tea for 2 weeks showed improvement in postpartum depression and reduced fatigue. They also reported being able to better bond with their infant!

This is the result of a lazy thyroid, the gland being responsible for producing hormones that control the metabolism. A lower metabolism is surely a trigger for weight gain, but it’s not just the excess belly fat that gives headaches to this group of people: they also tend to have poor circulation and cold extremities, hair loss, saggy underarm skin and brittle fingernails.


While there are some published studies on various ingredients often found in detox teas, I haven't seen any research on the teas themselves, particularly in the precise formulas they're prescribed (that research isn't required for the teas to be sold, by the way). That means that using detox teas leaves unanswered questions about if and how they work, how they should be used, how much may be too much, and possibly who shouldn't use them. If you're unsure, or are planning to start drinking them, talk to your doctor, nutritionist, or health care provider. Just be sure he or she doesn't have a vested interest in the sale of the product you're considering: If they happen to be selling or endorsing it, seek a second opinion.
Say good riddance to the summers filled with unhealthy lemonade. Kiss the bellyaches goodbye by switching to the joy of this stunningly sweet strawberry detox water. A rich lemon core purifies the entire digestive arena, and it masks most of the complex flavor with a brilliant spectacle of sour. Scrunched basil leaves really amplify the tang, and strawberries bring endless antioxidants to the table. Overall, this is not a drink to be trifled with; however, it can be enjoyed during all occasions. As a bonus, it offers a great method to show off a gardeners grand harvest each coming year.
To get rid of that excess fat, Dr. Kara Mohr, an exercise psychologist, and fitness expert, told Fitness Magazine: “I would suggest increasing the intensity of your cardio workouts, making sure you include intervals (alternating walking with fast walking or sprinting). And be sure your strength training includes combination moves that work multiple muscles including the core (plank rows, push-ups, squat with military press, etc) rather than single muscle groups.”
According to the National Institutes of Health, the third largest source of food calories in the American diet isn’t a food at all. It’s soda. We get more calories from soda every day than we do meat, dairy or anything other than baked goods. How can that be possible? Because of all the sugar. Mountain Dew, for example, not only delivers 52 grams of sugar per 12-ounce can, but gives you a delicious side helping of bromated vegetable oil, a component of rocket fuel. And I don’t mean metaphorical rocket fuel—I mean the stuff they actually put in the engines to keep the gears from exploding.
The stress hormone cortisol can really screw with your belly. The problem with cortisol is two-fold: First, the chemical makeup of cortisol causes the body to store visceral fat. Visceral fat is stored between your main organs and in the midsection and is the most dangerous type of fat. Experts state that visceral fat increases the risk of diabetes and heart disease.
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