A very rich dietary food, beans are packed full of nutrients, fiber, and protein. The protein and fiber are particularly good at helping reduce hunger after eating and decrease cravings that lead to excessive snacking. By helping reduce overall calorie intake, beans help reduce lower belly fat. Science Daily backs up these statements by reporting that beans “increased the feeling of fullness by 31 per cent, which may indeed result in less food intake.” Further, they state that “including [beans] in your diet may help you lose weight, and we think more importantly, prevent you from gaining it back after you lose it.” (6) Just be careful how you prepare and what you serve your beans with. If you are used to serving green beans with butter, cut the butter out. Avoid baked beans since they are cooked with large amounts of sugar, preservatives, and not good fats. Instead, try beans steamed or boiled and seasoned with herbs and spices.
The more you stress, the fatter you may become. Stress, from bills, family or work, causes you to produce more cortisol, a hormone that encourages your body to store excess calories as belly fat. Mindless eating and cravings for high-calorie, high-fat foods also accompany stress for a lot of people. Seek out alternative ways to deal with stress, such as talking with a friend or practicing yoga.
You can’t completely eliminate carbs from your diet, of course, as that will bring about a whole host of problems—so the trick is to avoid non-complex carbs such as white bread, white rice and pasta. Instead, go for complex carbs such as multigrain bread, brown rice and low-sugar fruits—these will help you to stay full without causing your sugar levels to spike.
Disclaimer: While we work to ensure that product information is correct, on occasion manufacturers may alter their ingredient lists. Actual product packaging and materials may contain more and/or different information than that shown on our Web site. We recommend that you do not solely rely on the information presented and that you always read labels, warnings, and directions before using or consuming a product. For additional information about a product, please contact the manufacturer. Content on this site is for reference purposes and is not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed health-care professional. You should not use this information as self-diagnosis or for treating a health problem or disease. Contact your health-care provider immediately if you suspect that you have a medical problem. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. Amazon.com assumes no liability for inaccuracies or misstatements about products.
When you decide to “go on a diet,” you’re making the conscious decision that this is a temporary choice. You’re going to go on it, but that means that you’re going to one day—probably sooner than you expect—go off it. That’s the concept of weight cycling (also known as yo-yo dieting), and it’s extremely unhealthy. A 2014 study in the journal Diabetes Care found that a pattern of weight cycling—losing at least five pounds and then gaining it back within two years—resulted in as much as a 33 percent higher risk of diabetes and higher blood pressure.
This is the result of a lazy thyroid, the gland being responsible for producing hormones that control the metabolism. A lower metabolism is surely a trigger for weight gain, but it’s not just the excess belly fat that gives headaches to this group of people: they also tend to have poor circulation and cold extremities, hair loss, saggy underarm skin and brittle fingernails.
×