Visceral fat is sometimes also call intra-abdominal fat. This is because visceral fat is found between your organs in the midsection. The activity level of the cells of visceral fat is what experts like Tim Church, the medical director of The Cooper Institute in Dallas, believe cause your body to be at a higher risk for heart disease and diabetes. And according to Anne McTiernan, lead researcher of a study at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle, visceral fat is likely to be the fat you will lose first through diet and exercise. McTiernan recommends aiming for 30 to 45 minutes of brisk walking five days per week, but suspects that 60 minutes of physical activity would be more beneficial in reducing belly fat.
The last point that she makes is that a hormonal imbalance can cause difficulties with appetite and sleep. Progesterone can calm the brain, while estrogen gives off a more exciting response. So, women who have high estrogen levels find it difficult to sleep at night, which disrupts leptin, the hormone responsible for your appetite. The more sleep deprived you are, the more hungry you may become, Attard says. To lower your estrogen levels, Livestrong recommends eating carrots. According to Natalie Ledesma, MS, RD, CSO, at the University of California, who spoke with Livestrong, carrots contain beta-carotene, which is effective in reducing the growth of estrogen receptor positive and negative.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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