If you’re a Snapple fan, you probably saw “Tea Cleanse” and thought, Great! But bottled teas aren’t necessarily the answer. First, once a tea is made and sits on a supermarket shelf for, oh, an entire NFL season, the nutrients have spent enough time exposed to light and air that they begin to break down. Plus, who knows what else has worked its way into that bottle? Snapple’s All Natural Green Tea packs 120 calories and 30 grams of sugar, while Ssips Green Tea with Honey & Ginseng is sweetened not so much with honey but with high fructose corn syrup.”
Longer form: I found this to be an interesting read and I would certainly consider drinking tea in the amount outlined in this book to see how it affects me. I drink tea on a semi-regular basis and haven't drunk calories (beyond the occasional beer or glass of wine) in years, so I don't know if my results would be profound, but they might be. I would like to see if drinking five cups per day does indeed help ...more
Some of the core workouts you can try include plank positions, leg lifts, and various types of crunches that work out the entire abdominal wall. Any workout routine should include a variety of exercises that target different parts of your core. In particular, you want to focus on your abs. That way, when you start to lose the weight through cardio exercises and better diet, you will have a toned midsection to show off.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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