Dina - WOW!! This is awesome news to hear! Just know that you are not alone in trying to be healthy after 40 or even after 50! You couldn't have said it better though when you said to maintain a better diet and exercise routine SLOWLY! I always tell my clients that it is a healthy lifestyle that you are looking towards living. In my mind there are no such things as quick fixes and to make these changes over time will lead to the overall lifestyle you are looking for. Congratulations to you and continue to make those slow consistent changes to your health! YES U CAN!
2. Exercise More. Contrary to what your body may want to do, you must exercise more regularly as you age, not less!  If you’re finding yourself slowing down, gradually start ramping it back up.  It’s not a good idea to go from taking an occasional walk to running a 10K.  That’s a fast track to getting an injury.  But start finding ways to fit more physical activity to your life.  The more you exercise, the more insulin sensitive you become (that’s the opposite of insulin resistant!)
I just hit 40 and decided to make things right for the second 40 ;) I always had a problem with diet and exercises. With diet it's always the same - radical changes, not enough food, recipes are rather complicated and not always tasty. With exercises - if you're not keeping the diet, you can work your ass of everyday and the result will be miserable. Thanks to one book - The Just Cut It Method by Jennifer Morris, I finally understood that the easiest way to lose weight and maintaine better diet is to do it slowly! Lose 50 lbs? Sure but in one year, not in one month! I'm after first month of cleaning my diet and fixing it to my lifestyle, I started to have a longer walks with dog everyday and slowly I'm awakening from the winter sleep ;)
It's a myth that eating at night leads to weight gain, Palinksi-Wade points out; it's more about what you're eating at night that can be an issue when it comes to weight management. "Since most of us don’t have a salad for a midnight snack, if you find you tend to eat calorie-dense, high-sugar foods in the evening (like a bowl of ice cream) setting guidelines as to when to stop eating may help you to lose weight faster."
For a sustainable plan, "I don't like to hyperfocus on calories. It's important to have a high-quality diet of lean protein, whole grains, and fruits and vegetables," Dr. Stanford says. "Processed foods lead to weight gain, so the less processed the food you eat, the better." And the more satisfied you could end up being. Her example: A nice meal of salmon plus some grains and a vegetable and a salad can give you a lot more volume than a Shake Shack stop would, and would give you more of a sense of being full afterward. When it comes to the high-quality diet she advocates, "nothing is bizarre—we know that lean protein, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables are constant no matter how the guidelines for healthy eating have changed over the years," she says.
Good stress management techniques and routine exercise will have positive effects on your sleep, but you may need to take additional steps to help you sleep better. For example, be proactive about going to bed and waking up at the same time most days, and allow yourself 30 minutes to unwind and disconnect from your digital devices at night. Eating a plant-forward, mostly whole foods diet that’s low in added sugar helps, too.
If you are taking the appropriate measures (e.g., eating enough of a calorie deficit for your age and body composition, stressing less, and working on strength training) and still not losing weight, and you also have other symptoms of hypothyroidism (such as constipation, fatigue, dry hair and nails), then it may be worth considering getting your thyroid levels checked," advises Dr. Peterson.

That delicious plate you just bought or cooked up might temp you to gobble it up in just a few bites, but that's probably not a good idea, says Palinski-Wade. "Eating slowly, eliminating distractions at meals, and even putting your fork down in between bites all allow you to get in touch with your body’s satiety signals and to stop eating when satisfied."
Guys often wonder whether a dip in testosterone is at the root of their weight gain, says Dr. Stanford. "When men develop overweight and obesity, they tend to have a drop in testosterone that leads to a drop in energy and more retention of adipose tissue,” she says. The excess adipose tissue drives testosterone down. But taking testosterone isn’t usually the answer. “That’s not the underlying problem. Once we normalize the weight, the testosterone normalizes," she explains.
Many women have trouble sleeping during menopause due to hot flashes, night sweats, stress and the other fun stuff that goes along with low estrogen levels.  Migraines anyone??  The bummer is poor sleep is linked to hunger and weight gain because of two more hormones:  ghrelin (the “feed me” hormone) and leptin (the “I’m full” hormone).  Here’s a short blog I wrote on that topic.  If you’re sleep deprived, these hormones get out of whack.
Amy Myers, MD is a two-time New York Times bestselling author and an internationally acclaimed functional medicine physician. Dr. Myers specializes in empowering those with autoimmune, thyroid, and digestive issues to reverse their conditions and take back their health. In addition, she is a wife, mother, and the successful founder and CEO of Amy Myers MD®.
Between desk jobs, commutes, and family activities, many 40-somethings don’t have a lot of free time to work out. But it’s important -- for your weight and your overall health -- to fit in at least 2 1/2 hours of moderate physical activity (like brisk walking or light yard work) every week. Pencil times in to your calendar, and make them a priority.
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