A few years back, the authors of Eat This, Not That! commissioned ChromaDex laboratories to analyze 14 different bottled green teas for their levels of disease-fighting catechins. While Honest Tea Honey Green Tea topped the charts with an impressive 215 milligrams of total catechins, some products weren’t even in the game. For instance, Republic of Tea Pomegranate Green Tea had only 8 milligrams, and Ito En Teas’ Tea Lemongrass Green had just 28 milligrams, despite implying on its label that the product is packed with antioxidants.

Eat a healthy diet. Emphasize plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Choose lean sources of protein such as fish and low-fat dairy products. Limit saturated fat, found in meat and high-fat dairy products, such as cheese and butter. Also limit processed meats. Choose moderate amounts of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats — found in fish, nuts and certain vegetable oils — instead.
There are currently no legal requirements for food manufacturers to label trans fats, according to the British Dietetic Association, so you need to check ingredients lists for hydrogenated fats and hydrogenated vegetable oils. The biggest culprits? Your ‘cheat day’ favourites: cakes, biscuits, ice cream, popcorn, pies, fried food, fast food, takeaways — the list goes on.
Put aside the butter and olive oil: coconut oil should be your new go-to medium for frying and basting. The reason is that it can withstand much higher heats, so it's less carcinogenic than other oils. Studies show that the medium-chain fats in coconut oil boost metabolism and decrease the amount of fat you store in response to high calorie intake.
If antioxidants are the good guys of gut health, trans fats are the supervillains. These sneaky fats actively contribute to your wobbly waist – not just by adding new fat, but by moving fat from other areas of your body to your belly. During a six-year study at Wake Forest University, monkeys that were fed an 8 per cent trans fat diet had 33 per cent more belly fat than monkeys that were fed an 8 per cent monounsaturated fat diet.

New Delhi: Carrots, as we all know, are one of the healthiest foods on the planet. They are an excellent source of vitamins, minerals and nutrients that boost health and reduce the risk of diseases. Carrots are a weight loss friendly vegetable that cleanses the liver, hence, they make an integral part of a detoxifying diet. Adding carrot juice to your daily diet could be one of the most effective ways to lose belly fat.
Barth often urges clients to limit their intake of animal protein while getting more fruits and vegetables, but it's important to make the swap slowly and drink plenty of water; otherwise, the increase in fiber could temporarily cause you to become even more bloated. Other patients turn out to be intolerant or sensitive to gluten, so they may have to cut back on grains (or, if they have celiac disease, eliminate them entirely).
Although it’s important for every body type to maintain a healthy weight and lose abdominal fat, it’s even more critical for you to lose weight to prevent future disease risks if you’re an apple-shaped type. The Belly Fat Diet plan is perfect for you and your type, because the weight loss in this plan is specifically geared toward losing your excessive belly fat.
In just one week on The 7-Day Flat-Belly Tea Cleanse, you will lose up to 10 pounds of stubborn abdominal weight; look and feel leaner and lighter, without grueling exercise; reset your metabolism to help make weight-loss long-lasting and automatic; sleep more soundly and feel more energized; dramatically reduce your risk of diabetes and heart disease; beat stress and bring complete calm to your mind.
Does the body type theory work in these cases? Well, knowing that you’re a pear or an apple is useful for identifying those exercises that can help you achieve a more proportionate appearance, but focusing more on the upper body or on the legs might not be effective in reducing the belly fat. So today we’ll talk about the Belly type theory, launched by chiropractor Eric Berg, author of a book called The 7 Principles of Fat Burning.
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