In men, adequate levels of testosterone are necessary to maintain a healthy fat distribution. However, research has shown that the presence of visceral fat can interfere with testosterone production, further exacerbating the storage of fat in the belly. Excess abdominal fat not only reduces testosterone production, but is also associated with a rise in the female hormone estradiol in men. It is unclear if testosterone decline associated with aging disrupts the production of testosterone, or if the accumulation of fat via weight gain leads to lower levels of testosterone. Either way, the reduction of visceral fat via lifestyle changes is beneficial for overall health in men.
Most detox teas contain caffeine, probably because this stimulant may suppress appetite, trigger your digestive system to let go of waste, and help you shed water weight. A caffeine-induced energy boost may also lead to working out a little longer or harder than usual. However, too much caffeine can also be risky (see above) and interfere with getting enough sleep–and catching too few zzzs may ultimately undo the tea's weight-loss effects. In fact, too little shuteye has been shown to trigger excessive eating and weight gain and even slow metabolism, which can make it easier to gain weight even if you don't eat extra calories. A good rule of thumb, regardless of where your caffeine is coming from, is to nix it at least six hours before bed. And if you're trying to shed pounds, commit to making adequate sleep a top priority.
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Many people have a tendency to overeat carbohydrates- especially the processed carbs like white pastas, breads, many cereals, and pastries. Though tasty, these foods pack on the lower belly fat. Studies show that diets full of these over-processed carbohydrates contribute to weight gain and cardiovascular problems and Type 2 diabetes. These quick to digest products do not leave you feeling full for very long.(9) In contrast, whole grains are rich in fiber and essential minerals. Food full of fiber satisfies your hunger for a longer period of time than foods lower in fiber. Additionally, whole grains can help lower cholesterol levels. And in some cases, whole grains can help protect you against certain cancer types. If that’s not enough, whole grains can:
Refined grains, more so than whole grains, expand your waist. In a 2010 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers found that increased intake of refined grains correlated with a greater amount of belly fat, while an increased intake of whole grains did not. Eat brown rice, quinoa and 100-percent whole-wheat bread in lieu of white rice and pasta. Include ample watery, fibrous vegetables at meals too -- they'll help fill you up without too many calories.
But it’s probably best to stay away from those ultra sugary, creamy beverages which are often made with sugary syrups or other flavorings that can stall your weight-loss efforts. Options for a sugar, cream and milk substitute. Choose a natural or artificial sugar substitute rather than regular sugar. Choose fat-free (skim) or 1% milk, or unsweetened almond milk. Avoid 2% and full-fat milk. Opt for sugar-free and fat-free creamers and limit your intake to 2 tablespoons per day.
After analysing 1,257 men and 1,366 women who participated in the Canada Fitness Survey they found waist size, "remained significantly lower in subjects performing high-intensity exercise." Worth stressing is this is not casually rolling back and forth on an ab machine or leisurely mounting the thigh master. An idea echoed by research published in the Journal of Obesity who stated, "High Intensity training three times per week was associated with significant reductions in total body fat, leg and trunk fat."

Chang: To be honest, I really didn't. But I knew there had to be a better weight loss answer. So I started talking to my patients. I wanted to find out what changes they were realistically willing to make and how much they were realistically willing to do to lose weight. What I found out? People need weight loss to fit into their lives. They still have jobs and kids and house cleaning and groceries. They don't have time for complicated diets and excessive workout plans.


You can’t completely eliminate carbs from your diet, of course, as that will bring about a whole host of problems—so the trick is to avoid non-complex carbs such as white bread, white rice and pasta. Instead, go for complex carbs such as multigrain bread, brown rice and low-sugar fruits—these will help you to stay full without causing your sugar levels to spike.
The good news is that visceral fat yields fairly easily to exercise and diet, with benefits ranging from lower blood pressure to more favorable cholesterol levels. Subcutaneous fat located at the waist — the pinchable stuff — can be frustratingly difficult to budge, but in normal-weight people, it's generally not considered as much of a health threat as visceral fat is.

That’s in part because when you restrict calories, you restrict nutrients. As a result, you lose weight on a crash diet, but much of it is lean, healthy muscle tissue. With less muscle, your body’s metabolism is set at a lower point. So when you go off the diet, even if you eat the exact same number of daily calories as you ate before, you’ll actually gain more fat than you originally carried.


If lots of women in your family have big bellies (rather than big hips or big butts), your DNA may be stacked against you. "About 50 to 60% of belly fat and weight gain is based on genetics," says Murphy. "You can't really change genes. But what you can do is modify their expression." Simply put, genetics may predispose a woman to gain weight in her midsection—but diet and exercise can influence how much weight stays on, and where.
The Ovary belly is a female-only problem and is accompanied by saddlebags and lower stomach fat. Very disturbing, these types of belly shapes are caused by an excess of oestrogens, and it’s favoured by hormonal changes that take place during menstruation and after giving birth. The Ovary belly comes with additional symptoms like thin hair, bloating, frequent acne outbreaks and headaches, heavy periods, facial hair and ovarian cysts.
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