Valerian is an herb that's long been valued as a mild sedative, and now research is showing what tea enthusiasts have known for centuries. In a study of women, researchers gave half the test subjects a valerian extract, and half a placebo. Thirty percent of those who received valerian reported an improvement in the quality of their sleep, versus just 4 percent of the control group. In a another study published in the European Journal of Medical Research, investigators gave 202 insomniacs valerian or a Valium-like tranquilizer. After six weeks, both treatments were equally effective. And in other studies, valerian root has been shown to increase the effectiveness of sleeping pills. While researchers have yet to identify the exact active ingredient, they suspect that receptors in the brain may be stimulated to hit "sleep mode" when coming in contact with valerian.

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According to the National Institutes of Health, the third largest source of food calories in the American diet isn’t a food at all. It’s soda. We get more calories from soda every day than we do meat, dairy or anything other than baked goods. How can that be possible? Because of all the sugar. Mountain Dew, for example, not only delivers 52 grams of sugar per 12-ounce can, but gives you a delicious side helping of bromated vegetable oil, a component of rocket fuel. And I don’t mean metaphorical rocket fuel—I mean the stuff they actually put in the engines to keep the gears from exploding.

High in good bacteria, the benefits of yoghurt on gastrointestinal health have been said to provide health benefits for certain gastrointestinal conditions, including lactose intolerance, constipation, IBS, colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, and allergies. Look for the nutrition label and make sure no added sugar is used. Opt for Greek yoghurt varieties and use your own frozen berries and cinnamon to sweeten.


First one’s the Adrenal belly or Adrenal shape, caused by increased levels of cortisol. When going through stressful periods, the production of cortisol increases, and this favours the accumulation of fat around the waist, leading to a saggy abdomen. Both men and women are likely to gain weight around the waist if they are constantly exposed to high levels of stress, and besides the excess belly fat, they are also likely to experience fatigue, back pain, nervousness, poor memory and sleep problems.
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