Watermelon detox water is a modern amenity that everyone should at least get to try once. There is no effort involved in this rapturous drink, and it yields a bounty of relaxation. Melons are great for cleaning out the bladder, and mint quells the woes of an upset tummy. Moms love giving this detox beverage to kids, and it is a great way to eliminate artificial fruit juices from the household diet. With this kind of water, every glass is unique. With an active curiosity, any kitchen can become a haven for alchemy. Prepare to turn H2O into liquid gold.

Samantha, yes absolutely! We don’t ever recommend “starve yourself” detoxes. There is a much healthier way to achieve great results than depriving your body of nutrients for a few days. I would recommend sticking to lighter foods though. You can detox from specific things such as sugar and carbs or you can try a smoothie/juice detox. Just try to fill up on salads and veggies rather than heavier stuff like meats during a detox. I hope that helps!
Refined grains, more so than whole grains, expand your waist. In a 2010 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers found that increased intake of refined grains correlated with a greater amount of belly fat, while an increased intake of whole grains did not. Eat brown rice, quinoa and 100-percent whole-wheat bread in lieu of white rice and pasta. Include ample watery, fibrous vegetables at meals too -- they'll help fill you up without too many calories.
If you need to curb an out of control appetite, basil may be your new best friend. This helpful herb can stamp out the need to eat for pleasure. It simply tricks the belly into feeling full. The cucumber takes advantages of this faux fullness, and it uses the stasis to empty out all of the body’s harmful chemical accumulations. This gentle green veggie allows water to be even more hydrating than it would be on its own. It has an obscure flavor, but the basil masks it with zesty fervor. Overall, this detox technique is trusted and time-tested.
If you’re a Snapple fan, you probably saw “Tea Cleanse” and thought, Great! But bottled teas aren’t necessarily the answer. First, once a tea is made and sits on a supermarket shelf for, oh, an entire NFL season, the nutrients have spent enough time exposed to light and air that they begin to break down. Plus, who knows what else has worked its way into that bottle? Snapple’s All Natural Green Tea packs 120 calories and 30 grams of sugar, while Ssips Green Tea with Honey & Ginseng is sweetened not so much with honey but with high fructose corn syrup.”
The average American now drinks about a gallon of soda a week. Add to that our odd new habits of swapping tap water for bottled “vitamin” water (+120 calories) and giving up plain iced coffee for Mocha Frappucinos (+520 calories) and you can see how quickly the calories add up—and that’s before chugging an “energy drink” that tastes exactly like what would happen if a crazed pastry chef hijacked a truckload of Smarties and drove it into a battery acid factory (another 280 calories). Those three drinks alone give you 920 additional calories—almost half a day’s worth!
The lower belly is one of those seriously frustrating body parts, and it’s not even an entire body part, it’s part of a body part – the lower bit of your tummy. This vexing semi-body part is the bane of anyone who’s lost weight, toned up, put in the hard work, done everything right, but just can’t seem to shift that lower belly bulge. Arrgh! That little belly bulge standing between you and a flat tummy. It is a tricky problem, but a fixable one. There are 3 causes of the lower belly bulge:

Refined grains, more so than whole grains, expand your waist. In a 2010 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers found that increased intake of refined grains correlated with a greater amount of belly fat, while an increased intake of whole grains did not. Eat brown rice, quinoa and 100-percent whole-wheat bread in lieu of white rice and pasta. Include ample watery, fibrous vegetables at meals too -- they'll help fill you up without too many calories.
At one time, we might have accepted these changes as an inevitable fact of aging. But we've now been put on notice that as our waistlines grow, so do our health risks. Abdominal, or visceral, fat is of particular concern because it's a key player in a variety of health problems — much more so than subcutaneous fat, the kind you can grasp with your hand. Visceral fat, on the other hand, lies out of reach, deep within the abdominal cavity, where it pads the spaces between our abdominal organs.
Before menopause, many women carry excess weight on their hips and thighs. But once "the change" happens, estrogen levels plummet, and even formerly pear-shaped women can develop round tummies. Meanwhile, testosterone drops, too. "By losing testosterone, you lose muscle mass. And when you lose muscle mass, it slows down your metabolism," says Steven A.R. Murphy, MD, an assistant professor at New York Medical College. "It becomes much harder to process simple carbohydrates, and that leads to fat storage."
In healthy people, the levels of blood sugar are higher in the morning, but in those with liver belly, the glycaemia values are lower, and the hunger sensation persists after eating because food isn’t properly processed and bile isn’t released in sufficient amounts. People with these types of belly shapes tend to crave sugary foods and to be constantly tired.
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